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SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made clear?

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KVAr_apc
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SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made clear?

This was originally posted on APC forums on 8/6/2007


The SUA2200 and its RM equivalent is rated at 2200VA only if you change the original plug L5-20P 125V 20A or hardwire it into the panel per UL 1778.

Out of the box with the pre-installed plugs, it is limited to 1920VA and this is explained in answer ID 184.
Installation doesn't warn about this.
http://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/ASTE-6YWRZE_R0_EN.pdf

Product description page says nothing of it.
http://www.apcc.com/resource/include/techspec_index.cfm?base_sku=SUA2200RM2U

I think this is something that should be made clear up front in spec page and manual. Why isn't it?

By the way, Answer 184 links to ID 942 but the photos on answer ID 942,does not load.


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KVAr_apc
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Re: SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made cle

This was originally posted on APC forums on 8/15/2007


JoeMomma wrote:
KVAr is right. It seems most other APC UPS models respect the 80% circuit capacity rule, but perhaps the APC marketing people forgot about it with the 2200 models.

APC would be selling SmartUPS 1800s with 5-15 plugs if they were allowed to use the entire 15 Amp circuit, no?
Take a look at SUA1500 spec. Notice the spec is 980W/1440VA? The UPS ships with 5-15P. I don't know the rationale for 1440, but my best guess is compliance with NEC and UL 1778, which makes 15A plug x 80% derate factor = 1.44kVA

Their own rating conflicts with their own EPP policy which requires installation in accordance with the local code.

In my opinion, to keep APC brand as the most respected UPS category, this kind of discrepancy should not exist and UL/CSA and NEC(and whatever Canada requires on their standard) should be precisely followed.

The APC SUA2200 should be rated 1920VA* just as SUA1500 is rated 1440VA

or, if it is to be rated 2200VA and ship with a NEMA 5-20P it should at least include a big warning on the product page itself, the manual and the product itself that capacity is limited to 1920VA unless retrofitted with 5-30P plug or hard wired into a 30A branch circuit by a qualified electrician. Same goes for the 3000VA Smart-UPS that ships with a 30A plug, which requires derating to 2880VA. 120VA or 1A, in real practice is not going to make any noticeable difference, but I don't believe it's a good design practice to invade a portion of safety margin for normal use.

If you look even further, a Smart-UPS 1400/1500 takes about 175VA for itself when the battery is discharged. On a model that draws full battery charge current for more than 3 hours (per NEC rule on >3hr load being considered a continuous load), there should be a derating taking this into consideration. This is something likely to affect the XL model with multiple battery packs attached.

2200VA with 20A plug = 1920VA permissible. 1920-n VA battery charger = 1920-n VA permissible load.

See Answer In Context

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Sgt._Slaughter_apc
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Re: SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made clear?

This was originally posted on APC forums on 8/8/2007


Hello,

Not exactly sure what you're getting at here. The SUA2200 and SUA2200RM2U both come standard with a NEMA 5-20P as the units' standard input plug. The 20amp plug plus the 120V supply, will give you 2200VA capacity out of the box. VA is a simple equation of Volts x's Amps.

If I am missing something please let me know.

Thanks.

KVAr_apc
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Re: SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made cle

This was originally posted on APC forums on 8/9/2007


Did you read the answer ID I mentioned?

http://nam-en.apc.com/cgi-bin/nam_en.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=184

It says that UL limits the current to 80% of the circuit's maximum capacity, so it wouldn't be orthodox to draw more than 16A through 5-20P.

BillP
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Re: SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made cle

This reply was originally posted by Matt on APC forums on 8/15/2007


KVAr is right. It seems most other APC UPS models respect the 80% circuit capacity rule, but perhaps the APC marketing people forgot about it with the 2200 models.

APC would be selling SmartUPS 1800s with 5-15 plugs if they were allowed to use the entire 15 Amp circuit, no?

KVAr_apc
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Re: SUA2200, SUA2200RM, out-of-box 1920VA limitation, why isn't it made cle

This was originally posted on APC forums on 8/15/2007


JoeMomma wrote:
KVAr is right. It seems most other APC UPS models respect the 80% circuit capacity rule, but perhaps the APC marketing people forgot about it with the 2200 models.

APC would be selling SmartUPS 1800s with 5-15 plugs if they were allowed to use the entire 15 Amp circuit, no?
Take a look at SUA1500 spec. Notice the spec is 980W/1440VA? The UPS ships with 5-15P. I don't know the rationale for 1440, but my best guess is compliance with NEC and UL 1778, which makes 15A plug x 80% derate factor = 1.44kVA

Their own rating conflicts with their own EPP policy which requires installation in accordance with the local code.

In my opinion, to keep APC brand as the most respected UPS category, this kind of discrepancy should not exist and UL/CSA and NEC(and whatever Canada requires on their standard) should be precisely followed.

The APC SUA2200 should be rated 1920VA* just as SUA1500 is rated 1440VA

or, if it is to be rated 2200VA and ship with a NEMA 5-20P it should at least include a big warning on the product page itself, the manual and the product itself that capacity is limited to 1920VA unless retrofitted with 5-30P plug or hard wired into a 30A branch circuit by a qualified electrician. Same goes for the 3000VA Smart-UPS that ships with a 30A plug, which requires derating to 2880VA. 120VA or 1A, in real practice is not going to make any noticeable difference, but I don't believe it's a good design practice to invade a portion of safety margin for normal use.

If you look even further, a Smart-UPS 1400/1500 takes about 175VA for itself when the battery is discharged. On a model that draws full battery charge current for more than 3 hours (per NEC rule on >3hr load being considered a continuous load), there should be a derating taking this into consideration. This is something likely to affect the XL model with multiple battery packs attached.

2200VA with 20A plug = 1920VA permissible. 1920-n VA battery charger = 1920-n VA permissible load.